dkmissanya:

houseofalexzander:

Sending a big “FU” to the corporate side of the fashion industry.

As an increasingly successful fashion blogger, I have been targeted by several brands, large & small, one of which is quite a large corporation.
Why?
Because I am undermining a very important part of their money making system.

Today, the fashion industry is split in half.
You have Women’s fashion & Men’s fashion.
You will find designers here and there who produce androgynous designs but for the most part, the industry (brands & corporate companies) want designers who either design Men’s wear or Women’s wear, and follow a very gendered structure. Everything from the tailoring to the materials has to be specific to the binary boy/girl gender system.
This is why you can’t find feminine style’s of clothing tailored for the average males body type in any department store, thus creating a “mens” & “women’s” division.

Every time I modify the clothing I buy in department stores to fit my body type and then model it for people to see, not only am I inspiring people to step out of the box with their fashion choices, but I am merging two markets into one.
Why is this bad for corporations?
MONEY
More markets equal more advertising and marketing opportunities which ultimately leads to more sales and more profit.

When I successfully inspire people to be less mindful about if they look like a girl or a boy, ultimately I am inspiring them to go against the gendered market system that brands and clothing companies make so much money off of.

I have received several hateful emails, discouraging my efforts as a fashion blogger. I was even asked by a large corporate clothing company to STOP buying their clothing and modifying it to fit my body type. They stated that by doing so, and sharing it with my audience that I was creating the illusion that gender did not exist, and that I am leading a bad example for society. …

A GENDERED SOCIETY CREATES A HUGE PROBLEM.
IT DIVIDES PEOPLE.

IT SEPERATES.
IT CONTROLS.
IT DISOLVES ANY & ALL ORIGINALITY.

FUCK YOU, to any clothing brand, company & corporation who’s got a problem with who I am, what I believe in & how I express myself.

-Elliott Alexzander

This is just so important! Gendered clothing is such bullshit and I want more people to realize!!!

sailorkinsei:

Please don’t go, I love you so | A Kyoumami fanmix

1. Two door cinema club - What you know // 2. Krewella - Alive // 3. Milky chance - Stolen dance // 4. A great big world - Say something // 5. Maroon 5 - Better that we break // 6. Gotye ft. Kimbra - Somebody that i used to know // 7. Lilly Wood & The prick & Robin Schulz - Prayer in c // 8. One republic - Counting stars // 9. Keri Hilson ft. Kanye West & Ne-yo - Knock you down // 10. Dido - White flag // 11. Arctic monkeys - 505 // 12. Triple h - Gray wednesday

listen

queerhawkeye:

i really really wanna be excited about the deadpool movie but wade is probs gon be one or more of the following: 

  • heterosexual
  • only scarred enough to be manly but not enough to be ‘deformed’
  • a really ableist parody of schizophrenia or
  • just an neurotypical guy who likes to ‘act crazy’ 

and i’m not all about that jazz 

hollyoakhill:

do you ever think about how little Michelangelo cared

I’ll never punish my daughter for saying no.

The first time it comes out of her mouth, I’ll smile gleefully. As she repeats “No! No! No!” I’ll laugh, overjoyed. At a young age, she’ll have mastered a wonderful skill. A skill I’m still trying to learn. I know I’ll have to teach her that she has to eat her vegetables, and she has to take a nap. But “No” is not wrong. It is not disobedience.

1. She will know her feelings are valid.
2. She will know that when I no longer guide her, she still has a right to refuse.

The first time a boy pulls her hair after she says no, and the teacher tells her “boys will be boys,” we will go to her together, and explain that my daughter’s body is not a public amenity. That boy isn’t teasing her because he likes her, he is harassing her because it is allowed. I will not reinforce that opinion. If my son can understand that “no means no” so can everyone else’s.

3. She owes no one her silence, her time, or her cooperation.

The first time she tells a teacher, “No, that is wrong,” and proceeds to correct his public school, biased rhetoric, I’ll revel in the fact that she knows her history; that she knows our history. The first time she tells me “No” with the purpose and authority that each adult is entitled, I will stop. I will apologize. I will listen.

4. She is entitled to her feelings and her space. I, even a a parent, have no right to violate them.
5. No one has a right to violate them.

The first time my mother questions why I won’t make her kiss my great aunt at Christmas, I’ll explain that her space isn’t mine to control. That she gains nothing but self doubt when she is forced into unwanted affection. I’ll explain that “no” is a complete sentence. When the rest of my family questions why she is not made to wear a dress to our reunion dinner. I will explain that her expression is her own. It provides no growth to force her into unnecessary and unwanted situation.

6. She is entitled to her expression.

When my daughter leaves my home, and learns that the world is not as open, caring, and supportive as her mother, she will be prepared. She will know that she can return if she wishes, that the real world can wait. She will not want to. She will not need to. I will have prepared her, as much as I can, for a world that will try to push her down at every turn.

7. She is her own person. She is complete as she is.

I will never punish my daughter for saying no. I want “No” to be a familiar friend. I never want her to feel that she cannot say it. She will know how to call on “No” whenever it is needed, or wanted.

Lessons I Will Teach, Because the World Will Not — Y.S. (via poetryinspiredbyyou)

googfriday:

❧ new on balderdash! • • • chapter v, pages 77-81 • beginning of chapter v

Afia intended to journey from Bakunini to the closest port in the River Valley, which was located in an insignificant little town called Löffel. According to her grandmother, this journey up the Merle River would take a little over three weeks. While the port was not particularly far, her grandmother’s boat was not meant for anything other than the casual wandering of a Hermit Seer.

Life on the Merle was significantly quieter than home. Although Afia spent plenty of time on her own, the absence of distractions like plays, libraries, people-watching, and friendly visits with family made her journey very lonely. Grandma wasn’t much for conversation. Everything she said to Afia either turned into an anecdote or a sermon. While Afia relished hearing it all, it made for poor company.

At the very least, Afia had a lot of time to think.

b !

offtothecircus:

morivan:

My dream for the 2016 presidential election is not having to choose which human rights I’m feeling like compromising on.

AMEN

deaddboy:

refer to trans ppl as “he-shes” and we are done. goodbye. don’t come back ever 

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